24 Recommended Reading from MIT Press

24 Recommended Reading from MIT Press | Abakcus

People are looking for illumination. And many of us are looking for added time for relaxation and deep reading. Books from MIT Press seem like an attractive solution.

MIT faculty and staff have been working hard and publishing new elegant books for lifelong learners!

Is MIT Press Good?

Established in 1962, the MIT Press is one of the largest and most distinguished university presses in the world and a leading publisher of books and journals at the intersection of science, technology, art, social science, and design.

These 24 books will provide you with high-quality information! Whether you’re looking to build perfect knowledge or understand our world, put these books on your wish list. Happy reading!

By the way, you should also check out, 73 Beautiful Books from the MIT Press Essential Knowledge Series.

The Character of Physical Law is a great place to learn about current physics and experience Richard Feynman at his most ebullient and entertaining. In his book The Character of Physical Law, Feynman tackled some of the most pressing and intriguing open questions in modern physics....
How to Stay Smart in a Smart World | Books | Abakcus

 How to Stay Smart in a Smart World 

How to Stay Smart in a Smart World? According to the doomsday prophets of technology, robots will one day rule the globe, leaving humans in their dust. While supporters of the tech business believe that replacing people with software could make the world a better place, tech industry critics warn of the potentially negative effects of surveillance capitalism. They are...
In his book The Polyhedrists, Noam Andrews traces the development of the relationship between art and geometry in early modern Europe. He does this primarily through the work of a group of innovative artisan artists, including Luca Pacioli, Albrecht Dürer, Wenzel Jamnitzer, and Lorentz Stöer, as well as through a thorough analysis of a wide range of their visual output,...
A fundamentally new style of thinking is required to tackle today's difficult problems; this new way of thinking integrates art, technology, and science to boost human creativity and understanding. Future innovators will need to be able to balance their creativity and execution skills, as well as manage complicated issues like pandemics and climate change. The Nexus is the location of...
All living things, from basic microorganisms to complex humans, are united by learning. What, though, is learning? How does it function, too? Psychologists have studied such issues for more than a century. While cognitive scientists have worked to understand the mental mechanisms that allow us to learn, behavior analysts have focused on how the environment affects behavior. The important discoveries...
The wavelength theory of light and color was well-established by the time Goethe's Theory of Colors was published in 1810. In Goethe's opinion, the hypothesis came forth as a result of mistaking an incidental result for an essential concept. He maintained that knowledge of physics made comprehension more difficult than just seeming to have it. He only drew his conclusions...
An introduction to the practice of proofreading is provided in this book. Leading research mathematician author provides a number of innovative and appealing mathematical claims with simple but intriguing proofs. Number theory, combinatorics, graph theory, game theory, geometry, infinity, order theory, and real analysis are only a few of the subjects covered by these arguments. The intention is to instruct...
"Many members of the public were first introduced to "metadata" when it first appeared in reports regarding spying by the National Security Agency and quickly rose to the status of breaking news. Should people be comfortable that the NSA was "just" gathering metadata—information on the caller, recipient, time, duration, and location—and not actual recordings of the conversations—about phone calls? Or...
"We are surrounded with imagery, some of it voluntarily and most of it not. Everything we see in this visual environment—color, the moon, a skyscraper, a stop sign, a political poster, rising sea levels, or a picture of Kim Kardashian West—somehow becomes readable, commonplace, and approachable. What causes this to occur? How do we function in our visual surroundings? This...
"Most robots don't make good friends. They mow the grass, remove bombs, sweep the rug, even do surgery—but they can't hold a conversation. It's difficult to look someone in the eyes. Wouldn't it be better if the robots were less mechanical and more social if the future promises more human-robot collaboration in both work and play? In his book How...
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